Girl Scouts and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
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Girl Scouts and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

For more than 100 years Girl Scouts has stood for making the world a better place, and pledged to “help people at all times.” Those words carry great weight and responsibility and inspire us with strength as we denounce institutional racism, violence, injustice, and inequity.

To make the world a better place, we must commit to working together build an antiracist society. Not being a racist is not enough. Honoring diversity without being inclusive is not enough. Inclusivity is a big part of the Girl Scout DNA. From the very moment founder Juliette Gordon Low first mentioned her plans to start Girl Scouts, it was set to be an organization not only for the girls of Savannah but also for “all of America, and all the world." And if you didn’t already know, Girl Scouts is a nonpolitical, nonpartisan organization, we are not red or blue, we are Girl Scout green and proud. 

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Resources for Parents

While we should be having conversations about race and racism regularly, checking in with your girl is crucial when racist violence claims lives and sparks widespread protest, grief, and unrest around the nation. See the resources below for guidance on navigating racism with your girls.

                                        

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Resources for Troop Leaders and Volunteers

As a Girl Scout volunteer, making all girls and families feel welcome and offering a safe space for your girl to talk about important issues is vital. Review these resources as you navigate discussions.

Programming for Taking a Stand Against Racism

Girl Scouts offers the following badges that promote civic engagement: Public Policy, Inside Government, Netiquette, Finding Common Ground, and Girl Scout Way. In addition, we offer many resources through our nonpartisan G.I.R.L. Agenda initiative that encourage girls to drive positive social change in their communities and world. 

Volunteer Essentials

Volunteer Essentials: Engaging Girls & Families

  • Creating a Safe Place for Girls
  • Communicating Effectively with Girls of Any Age
  • When Sensitive Topics Come Up
  • Volunteer Policies and Procedures (includes non-discrimination policy, whistleblower procedures, and more)
Safety Activity Checkpoints

Pages 18-19 emotional safety, mental health, and equal treatment

Our role is to help girls develop self-confidence and good decision-making skills that will help them make wise choices in all areas of their lives. Parents/guardians make all decisions regarding their girl’s participation in Girl Scout program that may be of a sensitive nature. As a volunteer leader, you must get written parental permission for any locally planned program offering that could be considered sensitive.

Training Resources
  • Lead and Learn- Being Inclusive

Our Lead and Learn on “Being Inclusive” helps adults understand what it means to create an inclusive environment and ways they can help develop an inclusive environment for both girls and adults. To request this Lead and Learn, please use the Lead and Learn Request Form

  • gsLearn – Diversity and Inclusion

gsLearn, our online learning platform for all things training, offers several opportunities to increase your diversity and inclusion IQ. To view the trainings below, remember to log into your MYGS account to log into gsLearn.

In Foundation 3 (Well Being and Development) of The Successful Leader Learning Series, learn strategies to creating an inclusive, girl led space, embracing troop diversity and understanding how the role of the troop leader, sets this framework.

In addition, gsLearn houses several other training on Diversity and Inclusion that can be helpful for Service Unit Teams and for your own personal professional development.

What is Diversity and Inclusion

Hiring for a Diverse Workforce

Identifying Diversity in Others

Leading a Diverse Workforce Part 1 and Part 2

Leveraging Diversity and Strengths in the Workplace

Your unique diversity in the workplace

                            

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Ways to Take Action

Girl Scouts Highest Awards

Through our Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards, Girl Scouts can take a stand about an issue that they care about and make a lasting change. 

Learn more about our Highest Awards and get started.

For some inspiration, read about Gold Award Girl Scout Nia P.'s project called Increasing Youth Engagement: A New Voice in Social Justice  where she informed her peers of racial equity and social justice issues.

Girl Scouts and Advocacy

Commit to taking action to make the world a better place by siging our pledge against racism.

A nonpartisan initiative to inspire, prepare, and mobilize girls and those who care about them to lead positive change through civic action.

Our Public Policy and Advocacy Office works across party lines with Congress and the Executive Branch to educate and raise awareness about issues important to girls and young women

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Have resources to share? Email them to us! Share with us how your troop is taking action through our Girl Scout story form.